Attraction
Attraction
Image not available
Cork began life as a monastic settlement in the sixth century under Saint Finbarr. As with Dublin it was the Vikings who founded the city as an urban port around 920 and it became a very important trading port. It developed into a thriving city through the ages and was at one point a fully walled city protecting the English City culture surrounded by a Celtic rural community. In more recent history from the 1900s, Cork was a very nationalistic city and was targeted by the British black and tans during the war of independence. It was held by the anti treaty forces for a while during the civil war. It was known as the people's republic of Ireland.
Image not available
The original structure on the site of Blarney castle was a wooden fort of which nothing remains. A stone fortification was built in 1210 but was destroyed in 1446. It was rebuilt by Cormac Ladir MacCarthy. During the Williamite war, the castle and grounds were confiscated by the Williamite forces. It passed through several hands before being bought by the Jeffryes family. They married into the Colthurst family who still own Blarney Castle today. It is home to the fabled Blarney Stone. You can hang upside down and kiss the stone to get the gift of the gab!
Image not available
The Rock of Cashel has traditionally been the seat of the King of Munster and was visited by The Queen of England at her request in 2011. The oldest building is the round tower dating back to the 1100s. The chapel of King Cormac Mac Carthaigh is a much more ornate and complicated structure than other buildings of its period built in 1127. The Cathedral was built between 1235 and 1270 and was the jewel in the crown of the Catholic church. Arthur Price, the Anglican Archbishop of Cashel, had the roof removed in 1749 which led to the fantastic church falling into ruin.